Fish of the Week: Name That Fish! – Finding Nemo

Alright, you ready to test your fish knowledge? We’re going to start with an easy one. If you have never watched Finding Nemo, you need to go watch it before continuing. Grab your kids, significant other, friends, and/or neighbors and watch it. If you have already, you’re all set to take the quiz. Ready? Scroll away!

Name! That! Fish! We’ll start with the easy ones first. No cheating!

Nemo and Marlin

Nemo & Marlin

Clownfish

Clownfish

Clownfish are known for living in anemones to protect themselves from predators. In exchange, the anemones get food (fish waste) and another line of defense!

Dory

Dory

Royal Blue Tang

Royal Blue Tang

Just calling these fish “Blue Tang” can be misleading. There are three different species of fish that can be considered Blue Tangs. This particular species, Paracanthurus hepatus, is at home in the Indo-Pacific waters.

Bruce

Bruce

Great White Shark

Great White Shark

Great white sharks are known for being fearsome predators. They are not the mindless killing machines that all people believe them to be. For more information about the fascinating world of the great white shark, check out Shark Week on the Discovery Channel.

Gill

Gill

Moorish Idol

Moorish Idol

Moorish Idols are believed to have gotten their name from the Moors of Africa. They thought that the fish was a bringer of happiness. They are very tricky to keep as aquarium fish. They are very sensitive to stress and have a relatively short lifespan.

Bubbles

Bubbles

Yellow Tang

Yellow Tang

Like we mentioned in our previous post, a yellow tang can make a great addition to a home saltwater aquarium. Remember to only get one for your tank! They can become aggressive if there is more than one of them per tank. They love munching veggies too!

Flo

Flo

Striped Damselfish

Striped Damselfish

Like its damselfish cousin, the Blue Damselfish, the Striped Damselfish is very territorial and will attack anything that enters its territory (even if it’s your cleaning brush!) Remember, if you are adding a damselfish to your tank, make sure there is PLENTY of room for everyone to have their own space. You will want to stick to the “1 damselfish per tank” rule, no matter what species.

Gurgle

Gurgle

Royal Gramma

Royal Gramma Basslet

A royal gramma basslet can bring a pop of color to any home aquarium. They are good for smaller tanks, since as adults, they are rarely bigger than 3 inches. This is another for the “only 1 per tank rule,” since they are very aggressive among others of their species.

Peach

Peach

Ochre Sea Star

Ochre Sea Star

The ochre sea star or purple sea star (“sea star” not “starfish” anymore) is found on the west coast of the US. It is a vicious predator off the coast of California, eating bay mussels, barnacles, limpets and snails among other species. This particular species can live up to 20 years! Sorry to the folks at Finding Nemo, but this isn’t a tropical sea star.

Bloat

Bloat

Puffer Fish

Puffer Fish

Some species of puffer fish are considered one of the most poisonous vertebrates in the world. Their liver, skin and some other organs, are highly toxic to anything that tries to eat them. They can also fill their highly elastic stomach with water and turn into a big pointy basketball. This is another defense mechanism that turns them from tasty fish into pointy sphere (not too tasty).

Jacques

Jacques

Pacific Cleaner Shrimp

Pacific Cleaner Shrimp

In the wild, these shrimp set up “cleaning stations.” Big fish, who normally eat shrimp, will line up and let the shrimp clean them of dead skin and parasites. The shrimp get a free meal and the fish get a clean external bill of health!

Well, that’s the end of our quiz. How did you do? If you aced it, I know you’re lying because even I had to look 2 of them up. Hope you learned something new today! We’ll be back with our regular Fish of the Week articles next week. Thanks for playing!

Comments

  1. So cute and clever to get kids involved and educated…JMCG

    Like

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